Recent News

Ultimate (and cheap) iPhone accessory: Motorola S9

I’ve fallen for the Motorola S9, a set of Bluetooth headphones that pair with my iPod Touch and my cell phone. Inside, they work great. I have great stereo sound while I’m sitting in my office. Outside, they work well, but I just have to have my iPod behind me. In either place, the volume and play/pause buttons rock. I just wish the forward and back buttons worked.

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New orgs pay attention! Nike does multimedia right

This is what multimedia journalism needs to do, and now is the time for it. In that final, students gave presentations on the process behind their stories. Over and over again, they mentioned that people just don’t know what’s going on around them. Many of their projects started out as diatribes but ended up as simple educational pieces. This is what good journalism does, I emphasized. It informs people, and sometimes, simply informing them will make people start caring.

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The difference two letters make: Tiny.url vs. bit.ly

So am I being alarmist in thinking bit.ly’s supplanting of tiny.url on Facebook is a conspiracy of Big Brother proportions? Yeah, probably. I’m thinking it’s more about saving two letters from the 140 Twitter offers on the 200 or so that fit in the newsfeed on Facebook. In fact, I applaud the innovation.

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Ohio U students show they get online journalism

Despite the time commitment, I don’t mind grading. If I’ve done my job correctly, it’s usually a validation of what I’ve been trying to teach all quarter long. I worried about this, my first quarter as an assistant professor, because I’ve been harried. Adjusting to academic life hasn’t been easy, but I was so impressed with the online journalism projects students in my J314/514 class turned in, that I felt pretty good about my first quarter at Ohio University.

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Teaching online journalism in a Web 1.0 world

How do I teach online journalism when I’m forced to use outdated tools? Honestly, it’s like forcing my newswriting students to use typewriters.

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Follow AOL! Disable your spam filter!

I understand spammers are active. I understand they are persistent. But if I can combat them on my little old blog with a free add-on, it’s ridiculous that AOL can’t. Any organization that enables comments on its site must have a spam blocking solution even if it means actually hiring someone to read the comments. It’s basic Internet etiquette.

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Sick Day rants: Lowe’s, PBS, and Blip.fm

I was home tending to a sick wife and sick children. But I still could have snuck away for 30 minutes to post because I had a lot of time to think sitting on the couch watching hours of PBS Kids. My thoughts included adapting PBS’s underwriting model to news, revamping Lowes.com to create community and using Blip.fm over Pandora.

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Esquire’s ‘augmented reality’ is just a gimmick

Actually, the additional content isn’t bad, but why do I need to hold up my magazine to get it. Why wouldn’t I just sit at my computer and call up Esquire’s Web site? If I have to get on the computer anyway, why do I need the magazine?

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Two posts in one day? Thanks Nablopomo!

In the spirit of NaBloPoMo, I’m now officially committed. What about you? I think I’ve got my wife signed on. Now, who else can I get?

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Mafia Wars, Farmville demonstrate strength of online connections

It’s amazing how a little social networking game can bring people together. For a gamer, like me, I think it’s especially significant, because for too long I’ve felt cloistered in my gaming pursuits. What I mean is that usually I play games with the same group. We’re the geeks who calculate the damage of wielding two long swords instead of a halberd. Now, however, I’m playing with the cool kids, and as silly as it sounds, it feels good.

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